Remembering Genocides – and the Power of Words

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Once a year we remember those who suffered, and continue to suffer, as a result of the Jewish holocaust. Holocaust Memorial Day 2018 falls on Saturday 27 January.

In the UK and around the world, 27 January has become known as Holocaust Memorial Day, a day when we remember all those countless numbers of people who have been affected by genocide. Why 27 January? This is the date when, in 1945, Auschwitz-Birkenau, the largest of the concentration camps, was liberated from the Nazis. Six million Jews were known to have been murdered by them, but the actual number could far exceed this. However, Holocaust Memorial Day is even more than remembering with sorrow the countless numbers of Jews as well as gypsies, gays and mentally and physically handicapped people who were killed by the Nazis. It is when we remember also all the genocides that have taken place since the second World War. On this day we call and pray for an end to racial violence.

To mark 27 January, the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust chooses a different theme each year, relevant to the Holocaust and subsequent genocide. This year the theme is The Power of Words. In these days of “fake news”, it is important to acknowledge the potency of words, both for evil and for good. It is important to remember those who have perished and to flag up a warning for the future, so that such atrocities will no longer disfigure humanity.

The national event to mark the Holocaust Memorial Day will be held in London, but all around the country thousands of events will be held locally – in town halls, schools, churches. See the interactive map for an activity near you on the website of The Holocaust Memorial Day Trust.

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The Power of Words 175.88 kB<
Resource produced by the Holocaust Memorial Day Trust exploring the the theme "The Power of Words"

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The Word This Week

“Repent, and believe the good news!”

clyde1-e1461609161706Where does Jesus begin his ministry? Where John the Baptist left off – preaching a message of repentance, of change, to welcome the new Kingdom of God. There is a simplicity about this message, which is not compromised by anything – today’s Gospel has these simple words from Jesus, and then the story of his calling disciples to follow him and share in the work of spreading the Good News. Repentance has something of a bad press – we tend to think of it as an old-fashioned concept. But every age needs to hear this call: to look and look again at what we do and say and assume, and see again that there are such things as right and wrong, and that sometimes we need an about turn. To follow Jesus, and to accept the Kingship of God, demands that we make a radical choice, which may well change our lives.

Today’s Scripture: (Psalter: Week 3)

Jonah 3: 1–5, 10

The people of Nineveh renounce their evil behaviour.

Response: Psalm 24

Lord, make me know your ways.
Lord, teach me your paths.
Make me walk in your truth, and teach me:
for you are God my saviour.

Remember your mercy, Lord,
and the love you have shown from of old.
In your love remember me,
because of your goodness, O Lord.

The Lord is good and upright.
He shows the path to those who stray,
he guides the humble in the right path;
he teaches his way to the poor.

1 Corinthians 7: 29 – 31

The world as we know it is passing away.

Acclamation for the Gospel:
Alleluia, Alleluia. Alleluia!
The kingdom of God is close at hand; believe the Good News.
Alleluia, Alleluia. Alleluia!

Mark 1: 14–20

Repent, and believe the Good News.
Prayer of the Faithful: R/. Lord, teach us your paths

Take a look at Today’s readings

Catholics in England and Wales to celebrate Peace Sunday

Pax-Christi-banner-PTNo one can be unaware of the tens of thousands of people around the globe who have been displaced and forced to leave their homes because of violence, war, trafficking and climate-related disasters , so it is no surprise that Pope Francis has chosen the theme ‘Migrants and Refugees – men and women seekers of peace,’ for his 2018 Peace Day message. Every year Catholics in England and Wales celebrate the Pope’s message on Peace Sunday, promoted by Pax Christi and supported by the International Affairs Department of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference.

In his letter to parishes, Archbishop Malcolm McMahon, National President of Pax Christi wrote:

“Many in the UK have responded to the invitation to shelter the stranger and more are involved in campaigns to stem this tragic flow in their work to challenge the arms trade and protect the environment.

“With this timely theme, we are all invited to reflect on our role to be peacemakers and peace-seekers today.” Continue reading “Catholics in England and Wales to celebrate Peace Sunday”

Cornerstone to host Cardiff’s first Poetry Festival

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As an art form, poetry seems to have diminished in the popular mindset in recent years; it is often considered food for children or intellectuals. The beauty and form of poetic prose touches the deepest seat of human emotions breathing life into the mind and heart and can often draw us closer to God himself. To limit poetry to another lost art form or literary work is to place limits on the human soul and its capacity for feeling, imagination and depth.

The Catholic Church has always been a great supporter of the arts, most noticeably in the great works of Art that adorn some of our finest churches, captivating the minds eye with the image of the Divine. This also stands true of poetry itself. Poetry is most notably found in the Liturgy fo the Hours (the Divine Office) as an alternative to the more traditional hymn in preparing us for our work of prayer. There have also been many great Catholic poets over history including Dame Edith Sitwell, Gerard Manley Hopkins and Joyce Kilmer. Continue reading “Cornerstone to host Cardiff’s first Poetry Festival”

Lion’s Roar: Mark’s Gospel

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Are you looking for something for you and your family to do on a Saturday in those dark afternoons after Christmas? Well, look no further. On Saturday 27th January we will be running an afternoon for all the family. There will be workshops looking at the Lion’s Roar: Mark’s Gospel. The afternoon starts at 11am and ends at 2.45pm (with a bring-and-share lunch).

There will be sessions for small children up to age 9; a youth drama session for young people from 10 to 16 and two separate workshops for adults: something for everyone! Please fill in the registration form in your pew, to be collected as you leave Mass today.

What are your New Year’s resolutions going to be? Why not add 1 more to the list?

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It’s 2018 and you’ve quit possibly decided on your New Year’s Resolutions. It may be to eat a little less or drink a little less, it may be to lose some weight or to see the world. But how about discovering the Catholic Faith?

Adults who wish to explore becoming a Catholic, or who simply wish to find out more about the Catholic faith, are welcome to ‘come and see’, as Jesus invited his first followers. The RCIA (Rite of Cristian Initiation of Adults, or Looking Into The Faith) group is run by Father Kelly and is aimed at those who would like to become Catholics or who would just like to know more about the faith. We should hasten to add that the group is also made up of people from the parish who come along to learn and to support those who may enter into the church. Our meetings are very informal and take place every other Thursday – we’ll even make you a cup of tea and offer you some biscuits!

Father John is always there (except when he attends meetings) as we explore the faith through a course called Evangelium (and the excellent Catholicism series), which offers an excellent grounding in the full panorama of Catholic beliefs. This course is delivered through a PowerPoint presentation and covers many of the questions you have about the Catholic faith. The RCIA has had a very good year in 2016-2017 and we have received into Communion and welcomed into the Church 6 new members in a glorious celebration of Easter 2017.

Here’s a trailer of the series that we watch:

If you’d like to know more, visit our Looking Into the Faith page on this website. And please let your friends and family know about this group.

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